For Healthcare Providers

For the modern woman looking for menopausal symptom relief*, manage her symptoms with an FDA-approved estrogen therapy designed for her.

Your patients can save up to $35 on your EstroGel prescription.  Learn more here.

  • *Only non-patch transdermal estrogen therapy that provides relief of both moderate to severe vasomotor symptoms and moderate to severe vulvar/vaginal atrophy symptoms due to menopause1† 
  • One dosing regimen ideal for modern women with active lifestyles 
  • Transdermal gel applied to the arm once daily
  • Provides effective relief with a low dose of estradiol1 
  • Plant based and similar to the estrogen women make naturally2 
  • Simple dosing—One pump, once a day 1 
  • Very low incidence of skin irritation—0.6% incidence of application-site reaction reported in clinical studies1  
  • Estrogen therapy alone or with progestin should not be used for the prevention of cardiovascular disease or dementia.

88% of EstroGel users surveyed reported being satisfied or extremely satisfied with EstroGel  (n=890)

89% of EstroGel users surveyed who used previous therapy said they prefer EstroGel3  (n=620)

To order additional samples or patient education materials, please contact your local EstroGel representative or call ASCEND Therapeutics at 1-855-786-0738.

When prescribing solely for the treatment of symptoms of vulvar and vaginal atrophy, topical vaginal products should be considered.

EstroGel® is indicated for the treatment of moderate to severe vasomotor symptoms due to menopause and for the treatment of moderate to severe symptoms of vulvar and vaginal atrophy due to menopause.  When prescribing solely for the treatment of symptoms of vulvar and vaginal atrophy due to menopause, topical vaginal products should be considered.

IMPORTANT RISK INFORMATION ABOUT EstroGel1

WARNING: ENDOMETRIAL CANCER, CARDIOVASCULAR DISORDERS, BREAST CANCER AND PROBABLE DEMENTIA

There is an increased risk of endometrial cancer in a woman with a uterus who uses unopposed estrogens. Adding a progestin to estrogen therapy has been shown to reduce the risk of endometrial hyperplasia, which may be a precursor to endometrial cancer. Adequate diagnostic measures including directed or random endometrial sampling when indicated, should be undertaken to rule out malignancy in postmenopausal women with undiagnosed, persistent or recurring abnormal genital bleeding.

Estrogen-alone therapy should not be used for the prevention of cardiovascular disease or dementia. The Women's Health Initiative (WHI) estrogen-alone substudy reported increased risks of stroke and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in postmenopausal women (50 to 79 years of age) during 7.1 years of treatment with daily oral conjugated estrogens (CE) [0.625 mg]-alone, relative to placebo.

The WHI Memory Study (WHIMS) estrogen-alone ancillary study of WHI reported an increased risk of developing probable dementia in postmenopausal women 65 years of age or older during 5.2 years of treatment with daily CE (0.625 mg)-alone, relative to placebo. It is unknown whether this finding applies to younger postmenopausal women.

In the absence of comparable data, these risks should be assumed to be similar for other doses of CE and other dosage forms of estrogens. Estrogens with or without progestins should be prescribed at the lowest effective doses and for the shortest duration consistent with treatment goals and risks for the individual woman.

Estrogen plus progestin therapy should not be used for the prevention of cardiovascular disease or dementia. The WHI estrogen plus progestin substudy reported increased risks of DVT, pulmonary embolism (PE), stroke and myocardial infarction (MI) in postmenopausal women (50 to 79 years of age) during 5.6 years of treatment with daily oral CE (0.625 mg) combined with medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) [2.5 mg], relative to placebo.

The WHIMS estrogen plus progestin ancillary study of WHI reported an increased risk of developing probable dementia in postmenopausal women 65 years of age or older during 4 years of treatment with daily CE (0.625 mg) combined with MPA (2.5 mg), relative to placebo. It is unknown whether this finding applies to younger postmenopausal women.

The WHI estrogen plus progestin substudy also demonstrated an increased risk of invasive breast cancer. In the absence of comparable data, these risks should be assumed to be similar for other doses of CE and MPA and other combinations and dosage forms of estrogens and progestins.

Estrogens with or without progestins should be prescribed at the lowest effective doses and for the shortest duration consistent with treatment goals and risks for the individual woman.

EstroGel is contraindicated in women with any of the following conditions: undiagnosed abnormal genital bleeding; known, suspected, or history of breast cancer; known or suspected estrogen-dependent neoplasia; active deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, or history of these conditions; active arterial thromboembolic disease, or a history of these conditions; known anaphylactic reaction or angioedema to EstroGel; known liver impairment or disease; known protein C, protein S, or antithrombin deficiency, or other known thrombophilic disorders; known or suspected pregnancy.

Increase in the risk of breast cancer, ovarian cancer, gallbladder disease, severe hypercalcemia in patients with breast cancer and bone metastases, visual abnormalities such as retinal vascular thrombosis, elevated blood pressure, hypertriglyceridemia, hypothyroidism, fluid retention, and hypocalcemia have been reported in patients receiving estrogens.

Estrogens may cause an exacerbation of endometriosis, angioedema in women with hereditary angioedema, asthma, diabetes mellitus, epilepsy, migraine, porphyria, systemic lupus erythematosus, and hepatic hemangiomas and should be used with caution in women with these conditions. Use with caution in women with hepatic impairment and/or past history of cholestatic jaundice, and in the case of recurrence, medication should be discontinued. Moisturizer lotion application 1 hour after EstroGel application significantly increased estradiol absorption. Alcohol-based gels are flammable. Avoid fire, flame, or smoking until the gel has dried.

In clinical studies, the most commonly reported adverse events for EstroGel were breast pain, headache, and flatulence.

References
  1. EstroGel 0.06% (estradiol gel) [package insert]. Herndon, VA: ASCEND Therapeutics; 2014.
  2. Data on file, Ascend Therapeutics.
  3. Simon JA, Mackowiak JI. Independent web-based vs "meaningful use" patient portals in assessing patient-reported outcomes: The estradiol gel 0.06% case study. SRM(supp.) October 2011;1-9.